Tuesday
August 22 2017


TIME:          US  |   UK  

WEATHER:  US  |   UK  

THE AMERICAN MAGAZINE ONLINE
      Back Issues

WHAT'S ON
      Diary Dates

SPORTS
      Features & Blogs

FEATURES
      Politics blog
THE NEIGHBORHOOD
  "Life in the UK"

      American Groups
      Essential Contacts
      Money
      Education
      Driving
      Property





















SPORTS

Obituary: Ex–Penn State coach Joe Paterno dies, aged 85
January 23rd, 2012          Richard L Gale

Joe Paterno
Joe Paterno
Football coaching legend Joe Paterno has died at the age of 85, following complications arising from treatment for lung cancer. He died on Sunday January 22 at a State College hospital, though some media outlets had prematurely reported his death the previous night.

Coach Paterno's football legacy has no equal. He was Penn State's head football coach from 1966 to 2011, the longest tenure of any Division 1/FBS coach. In his final game in charge of the Nittany Lions he attained 409 wins, breaking Eddie Robinson's Division 1 record. Coach Paterno won two national championships, and in 46 years, logged five undefeated seasons and 33 seasons in which the Nittany Lions finished as a ranked team, 21 of those in the top 10.

Joseph Vincent Paterno was born on December 21, 1926, in Brooklyn — he never lost the accent. After a short spell in the Army, Paterno attended Brown University, where he played cornerback and still shares the record for career interceptions. After graduating in 1950 he immediately took an assistant coaching position at Penn State, where former Brown head coach Rip Engle had been appointed, and succeeded him in the role.

However, Paterno's influence extended far beyond the football field, and he became an icon of Penn State University, preaching a commitment to education and good conduct. Joe and his wife Sue contributed millions to college departments, including the Penn State All–Sports Museum, a spiritual center, and helped raise over $13m for the University's Pattee Library.

Amongst many tributes following his death, former President George H. W. Bush said Paterno was 'respected not only on the field of play but in life generally'.

© All contents of www.theamerican.co.uk and The American copyright Blue Edge Publishing Ltd. 1976–2017
The views & opinions of all contributors are not necessarily those of the publishers. Whilst every effort is made to ensure that all content is accurate
at time of publication, the publishers, editors and contributors cannot accept liability for errors or omissions or any loss arising from reliance on it.