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London Steakhouse

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London Steakhouse

386 King's Road, Chelsea, London, SW3 5UZ
Reviewed by Michael M Sandwick
Published on July 12, 2019
www.londonsteakhousecompany.com/chelsea

I often have lengthy conversations about nutrition with my personal trainers. Yes, plural. It takes more than one these days. Our discussions have helped me change my eating habits but I still consider myself to be an omnivore with the ability to eat everything. So I do! It's my job!!! I have accepted however, that eating red meat is generally a no-no. Seeds and quinoa with the occasional bit of chicken and fish provide ample protein…until my inner carnivore starts to roar. When that happens, I feel a burning desire to put my incisors and canines to use and tear into some flesh. Preferably, a steak. On Monday, I took to the wilds of Chelsea and did just that. GRRAAAAUUUU!

Hunting in Chelsea definitely beats foraging in South Tottenham. I guess that's why Marco Pierre White put one of his two steakhouses there. It's posh in a timeless way. Linen and leather, neither gimmicks nor ostentation. Split over three levels, it's a place for intimate dining. Service is what you would expect in this neck o' the woods. Top. So are the prices.

The menu has a few British classics with a couple of new vegan and vegetarian dishes in a singular nod to today's trends. But as the name suggests, this is a place for steak, and it's good. From renowned butcher, Aubrey Allen, it's grass-fed and dry-aged, British meat.

My guests and I always share. It comes with the territory. Cured mackerel with pickled apple and horseradish crème fraiche (£13.75) gave us only one bite each, but a good one. Far more delicate than the description suggests, the flavours had both contrast and harmony.

Burrata with cherry tomatoes and a very light pesto (£11.50) was good quality, simple and light. I found myself longing for a crust of bread to sop up the remaining juice.

London Steakhouse has an exclusive arrangement with wine producer Artur Gama of Lisbon. We sampled their 2015 red reserve at £41 for 500 ml. Excellent. Dark fruit, lots of spice and good tannin structure. I enjoyed every drop.

Then the meat. A 12 oz. sirloin on the bone (£31) and a 14 oz. rib-eye (£40). Both superb quality; the sirloin juicy with a firm texture to bite into and the rib-eye soft and bursting with the flavour of fat. Arteries be damned! They come unadorned so we added bone marrow with lemon and parsley (£4.50) and green peppercorn sauce (£2.50). Sides are another £5.25. We chose potato croquettes because nobody ever makes them at home. A treat with a sprinkle of parmesan and truffle oil. We ordered greens for a healthy option. Thankfully, they were buttered and served with lardons so they also tasted very good!

Lemon posset with raspberries (£8.50) was a bit thin but had plenty of zing. Sticky toffee pudding (£8.50) was solid. No nonsense and gobs of sauce!

Back to my nuts and berries now ...until my stomach starts to growl!

>> MORE FOOD & DRINK

London Steakhouse


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